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This image of King George V and Queen Mary appeared in the January 1919 Norwester magazine with an article describing each of the London Y.M.C.A. ''huts'' belonging to the English-speaking countries fighting in the war: United States, Canada, Great Britain, New Zealand, and Australia. John Wesley Pontius described the services these huts provided for both officers and enlisted men. The Eagle Hut provided soldiers with social rooms, fireplaces, theatres, game rooms, music corners, and a...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/4876085765
This image accompanied a group of letters in the February 1919 Norwester magazine titled ''Paragraphs from Some of Our Folks Overseas.'' The letters were from U.S. Army officers and enlisted men as well as a Red Cross nurse. They were written near the end of the war, the first major war in which air power played a significant part. The effect on soldiers is evident in a letter from Corporal John Hill of the Artillery, American Expeditionary Forces (A.E.F.) in France. He wrote, ''Gee! but it's...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/5121166815
This image of a crude log cabin accompanied an article about the founding of the city of Columbus in the January 1919 issue of the Norwester magazine. The photograph's caption was ''The First Type of White Man's Home in Columbus.'' The article explained that Chillicothe was the original state capital, but in February 1810 the Ohio Legislature appointed five commissioners to determine a more centralized location for the capital. The chosen site was on the high east bank of the Scioto River where...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/4876085941
Rudyard Kipling, the English poet, short story writer, novelist and children's author spoke frequently and passionately about the need to defeat the Germans during World War I. He was a strong supporter of all the soldiers fighting for the Allied Powers. His only son, John, was killed in action in the Battle of Loos in 1916. In a New York Times article dated December 29, 1918, two months before this photograph was printed in the Norwester magazine, Kipling and his wife (an American) were...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/5247096489
Thomas C. Connor was born in 1868 in Milford Center, Ohio. He attended business college in Columbus, Ohio and later entered the oil industry. In 1901, Connor married Grace Hunter, from North Lewisburg, Ohio, and the couple had three children: Lawrence R., William H., and Thomas Jr. The Connor family resided at 1945 Concord Road, a home originally occupied by Paul Frye and his family. After the Connors moved, their home was purchased by the Cruickshank family. This image available online at the...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/4942429009
Eight children enjoy a game of marbles in front of the Jack V. Hollar home at 1952 Concord Road. The photograph, captioned ''Just a Game of Marbles,'' appeared in the February 1919 Norwester magazine. In the book History of Upper Arlington, Emily Frances Furniss Raymond, whose family moved to 1800 North Devon Road in 1916, recalls, ''We had intricate rituals for jumping rope, playing jacks, hop-scotch and mumblety-peg. Marbles was popular. So was spin-the-milk-bottle, and kisswink, and post...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/4974606700
In addition to the new homes constructed in Upper Arlington, this small playhouse was built facing Concord Road during the mild winter of 1918-1919. The tongue-in-cheek article that accompanied the image purports to name the contractors (Hollar Bros. and Connor), building inspector (Mr. J. B. McGaughey), plumbing and masonry sub-contractors (smaller boys), as well as the decorators (Thompson, Fenton, Royer Co.) of this humble abode. This image available online at the UA Archives> Read the...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/4974606890
1812 Bedford Road, near Tremont Road, was the location of the home of Carey Clayton Hoel and his wife, the former Viva May Clark. C.C. Hoel worked as a wholesale distributor of electrical supplies and enjoyed playing baseball and golf. Ferd Wetsel purchased the home at 1812 Bedford Road after the Hoel family moved. This image available online at the UA Archives> Read the related ''Norwester'' magazine article at the UA Archives> ---------------------------------------- Identifier:...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/4942429447
This view shows the newly developed intersection of Upper Chelsea Road and West Devon Road. The homes at 1808 Upper Chelsea Road and 1816 Upper Chelsea Road are visible, and the back of 2071 Stanford Road can also be seen to the left behind these homes. Small trees have been planted and the characteristic ionic column lampposts are already in place. The lampposts were made of poured concrete topped with a white globe and were a source of pride in the early days of Upper Arlington. This planned...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/5121166919
Alfred Holt was a familiar and beloved figure in the Upper Arlington community's early history. Some knew Alf as the village's first mailman and a delivery person for The Norwester magazine. Some knew him as a driver of floats in the July 4th parade, and some knew him as a general handyman. Others knew him as one of Santa's helpers and the deliverer of the cyclamen plant that each home received as a gift ''from St. Nick'' at Christmastime in 1917. The children in the village also knew Alf as...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/5247096377
In 1919 Dr. George S. Hershey and his wife, the former Frances Perry, lived in this home at 1700 Arlington Avenue. Dr. Hershey was born in West Salem, Ohio and attended school in Westerville, Ohio. He was a graduate of the dentistry program at The Ohio State University, a respected member of the dental profession, and an avid golfer. He was active in the civic life of Upper Arlington and was a member of the Athletic Club, the Columbus Riding Club, the Columbus Automobile Club, and the Upper...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/5323567539
This home at 1327 Mulford Road in the Northwest Boulevard area of Grandview Heights appeared in an advertisement in the February 1919 Norwester magazine. The Northwest Boulevard Company was selling this ''modern bungalo'' [sic] featuring a living room with fireplace, dining room, kitchen, two bedrooms and a bath on the first floor, two rooms on the second floor and plenty of space for a garden. This image available online at the UA Archives> Read the related ''Norwester'' magazine article at...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/5121769024
Carey Clayton Hoel was born in Versailles, Ohio. He took up farming upon leaving school, then entered the hardware business in Lima, Ohio, where he met his future wife, Viva May Clark. After moving to Upper Arlington, Hoel worked as a wholesale distributor of electrical supplies. In his spare time, he enjoyed playing baseball and golf. The Hoel home was located at 1812 Bedford Road. This image available online at the UA Archives> Read the related ''Norwester'' magazine article at the UA...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/4943016040
In 1919 the Willard S. Crater family lived in this home at 1802 Coventry Road, which was formerly occupied by the Joseph F. Barker family. Mr. Crater was employed by the Bell Telephone Company for many years. During the adoption of the Village Charter in March of 1919, Crater was elected as a member of the Upper Arlington Charter Commission and was integral to the framing of the document. In addition to his civic responsibilities, Mr. Crater enjoyed gardening and playing baseball. Mr. Crater...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/5323566869
Dr. George S. Hershey was born in West Salem, Ohio and attended school in Westerville, Ohio. He was active in the civic life of Upper Arlington and enjoyed membership in the Athletic Club, the Columbus Riding Club, the Columbus Automobile Club, and the Upper Arlington Chamber of Commerce. An avid golfer, Hershey impressed his neighbors with his talent at the Upper Arlington Fishing Club's third annual picnic in September of 1920. His skill with a golf club earned him a mention in the Norwester...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/5323567407
Ralph Lemuel Denman and his family lived in this home at 1819 Coventry Road. Mr. Denman was born in Wakeman, Ohio in 1883. While working in the roller skating business in Auburn, New York, he met his future wife Charlene Huston. The two married in 1907 and arrived in Columbus, Ohio later that year. They had two children, Virginia Josephine and Pierce Huston. Although Ralph Denman's work schedule kept him very busy, he made time for the occasional baseball game and earned a reputation among his...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/5324172030
''Ralph Lemuel Denman was born in Wakeman, Ohio in 1883. While working in the roller skating business in Auburn, New York, he met his future wife Charlene Huston. The two married in 1907 and arrived in Columbus, Ohio later that year. They had two children, Virginia Josephine and Pierce Huston. After moving to Upper Arlington, the family resided at 1819 Coventry Road. Although Ralph Denman's work schedule kept him very busy, he made time for the occasional baseball game and earned a reputation...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/5323567023
J. Edwin Harris was born in 1868 in Columbus, Ohio. Harris married Melissa Woolare in 1896, and the couple had two sons: Edwin W., and Robert J. The family resided at 1750 Upper Chelsea Road. Edwin W. Harris served in France during World War I, and Robert Harris attended The Ohio State University. J. Edwin Harris was employed by the Jeffrey Manufacturing Company for over thirty years but found time for sports, including baseball, football, and horseshoe pitching. In 1918, after Upper Arlington...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/4942495335
Willard S. Crater was born in Quincy, Michigan in 1873. He moved to Ohio as a young man and married Rilla Lue Warner, a Springfield woman. They had one child, Willard S. Crater, Jr. After settling in Upper Arlington, the family resided at 1802 Coventry Road, a house formerly occupied by the Joseph F. Barker family. Mr. Crater was employed by the Bell Telephone Company for many years. After the adoption of the Village Charter in March of 1919, Crater was elected as a member of the Upper...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/5323566753
J. Edwin Harris, his wife, the former Melissa Woolare, and their children, Edwin W. and Robert J., lived in this home at 1750 Upper Chelsea Road. J. E. Harris was employed by the Jeffrey Manufacturing Company for over thirty years but found time for sports, including baseball, football, and horseshoe pitching. In 1918, after Upper Arlington was incorporated as a village, Harris was one of six councilmen elected to govern the community. This image available online at the UA Archives> Read the...
Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uaarchives/4943082356